Message From The Author

Anne Rice

Book Title: CHRIST THE LORD: OUT OF EGYPT
Genre: Historical Fiction, Historical Romance

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Author's Message

ANNE RICE'S LITERARY JOURNEY

Anne Rice is one of the most creative, courageous writers of our time. She resurrected the vampire novel not as
a tale of horror, but with a sensuality and a depth of humanity never seen before in the canon. Her exquisite prose pushed Lestat out of the old genre and into an entirely new world of fiction. She created his world at a "dark and desolate" time in her life, after the death of her 6-year-old daughter.

Readers may see her new series, beginning with Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt, (Nov. '05, Knopf) as a departure, but in truth, Rice has never been far from the spiritual. The vampire Lestat collects crosses, and throughout the Vampire Chronicles he ponders his place within a spiritual world (most memorably in Memnoch the Devil). Through her novels, Rice fans have noticed her slowly moving out of the bleakness and into a healing light.
For years, the author has steeped herself
in Old and New Testament literature. Now,
in tandem with her artistic move to the more spiritual realm, she has moved from New Orleans to an Italian-style villa in California, where she keeps a vast library of religious
literature in her garage.

Critics are comparing Christ the Lord to Tolstoy's The Gospels in Brief -- quite a comparison! But Rice succeeds with sparse prose, perfectly expressing a 7-year-old's thoughts and inner struggle with the world in which he lives and what he is meant to do. Her personal and profound faith comes through on every page of a remarkable novel that may be controversial in its approach but, as one critic stated, is a true "act of faith." This is a novel that defies qualifying, just as Rice cannot be put in just one category. She challenges her readers, wants them to think long and hard about their beliefs and does not shrink from their criticisms. -- Kathe Robin


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