Message From The Author

Author's Message

Splendid

The year 1994 was a big one for me. First I was accepted at the Yale School of Medicine, then I signed a two-book contract with Avon. I decided that writing romances was infinitely more fun than dissecting cadavers, and notified Yale that I would not be attending.

I don't regret the time I put into preparing for medical school. Aside from the fact that my classes were extremely interesting, my lab partner appeared on "Jeopardy," and I coached him to a $53,000 win. As a result, I am now a veritable fountain of random facts. (Drop me a line if you want to know who was the first British author to win the Nobel prize in literature.)

Splendid is my first novel. Emma Dunster is a rather stubborn American who visits her cousins for a season in London, fully intending to return to Boston to run her father's shipping company. Alexander Ridgely, the Duke of Ashbourne, is a notorious rake who is determined to avoid marriage until he's at least forty.

I had a lot of fun messing up their plans.

Neither one of them particularly wanted to fall in love. Alex discovers that love can creep up on a man not only when he least expects it, but also when he absolutely doesn't want it:

He'd always planned to marry some girl without a personality and ignore her. He didn't need a wife getting in his way.

But the fact of the matter was-he wanted Emma in his way...

He found himself looking into the future and trying to picture those heirs his mother kept reminding him about. A little boy with carroty hair. No, a little girl with carroty hair-that was what he wanted. A tiny little girl with carroty hair and big violet eyes who would hurl herself into his arms and scream, "Papa!" when he walked into the room.

Readers: help me decide! Will it be a little girl or Emma's choice of a little boy with black hair? I'm currently working on the sequel to SPLENDID and have to decide soon.

Cast your vote c/o: Avon Books Publicity Dept., 1350 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019.


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