Every year, the review staff at RT Book Reviews reads and rates more than three thousand books. And when each year draws to a close, we pick the best of the bunch for our readers to enjoy — the Reviewers’ Choice Awards. For the next few weeks, leading up to Thanksgiving, we’re going to be celebrating the nominations for many of these awards, across genres. We hope you’ll join us in congratulating all these wonderful authors, and, hey, if you find a great new book to read, all the better!

Today, we celebrate the nominees of Ebook Erotic Romance!


       

       

 

Delphine Dryden, The Seduction Hypothesis

How do you feel e-publishing best lends itself to the erotic romance genre?

I love the anonymity and privacy of e-readers. While the internet has opened so much of our lives to public view, I think the devices on which we consume media can have the opposite effect. I can read an e-book on my phone, a tablet, computer, dedicated reader ... and nobody ever has to know. People can read erotic romance anywhere now. When you're already reading something that has you squirming in your seat, a little added anonymity goes a long way!

Which "turn-off" descriptive words (e.g. moist, member, etc.) do you refuse to use when writing a sex scene?

Ugh, moist! I think most people now agree that word should have no — or very limited — usage in sex scenes (although I'm sure I've used it in the past at least once ... you do run out of useful words to describe wet things). I hate the word "titty" and would never use that in a sex scene. Ick.

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Katie Porter, Hard Way

How do you feel e-publishing best lends itself to the erotic romance genre?

E-publishing is fabulous for erotic romance because it allows us to experiment. In our NY house work nudging boundaries is a lot of fun. In a book like Hard Way, we absolutely slam past boundaries. Um. I swear I didn't mean the pun on Hard Way's theme.

Which "turn-off" descriptive words do you refuse to use when writing a sex scene?

We get two words since we're two people, right? Carrie Lofty picks "oozing." Lorelie Brown picks "weeping." Variations on a theme, which is why we work so well together!

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Kristen Proby, Fight With Me

How do you feel e-publishing best lends itself to the erotic romance genre?

I think being able to read romance in an anonymous capacity, is very attractive to readers. They can download, read and enjoy the books without fear of being judged as they might if they were holding a paperback in their hands.

Which "turn-off" descriptive words do you refuse to use when writing a sex scene?

There are a few. Hot channel, throbbing member, warrior, joystick, love muscle are all descriptions you will not find in my stories.

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Kit Rocha, Beyond Pain

How do you feel e-publishing best lends itself to the erotic romance genre?

Digital books typically have a lower initial cost to produce, which makes them great for erotic romance. It means that readers have a greater chance of finding the kinds of books they want to read — no matter what hot and possibly taboo subject matter they desire!

Which "turn-off" descriptive words do you refuse to use when writing a sex scene?

I'd say the top four turn-offs: weeping, cream, gash and slit.

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Cassandra Carr, Unexpected Top

How do you feel e-publishing best lends itself to the erotic romance genre?

I think there are several ways in which e-publishing is useful for the erotic romance genre, not the least is the anonymity factor. Many women would prefer to keep their choice of reading material private for any number of reasons, whether personal, like not wanting other moms in the park knowing you're reading steamy stuff, to professional, like being a bank executive who enjoys a little downtime at lunch without possible recrimination.

Additionally, erotic romance tends to be done in many different formats, from short stories to epic series novels. Other genres of romance also see these, but it seems like erotic romance has emerged as one of the genres with the widest variety of word counts. E-publishing makes this possible.

Which "turn-off" descriptive words do you refuse to use when writing a sex scene?

Moist and member definitely hit the list. I try to stay away from turgid, and if I use it, it's often a private joke of some sort. I also don't tend to use slit to describe female anatomy, because it's not an accurate description of the area. It's not like I've got an anatomy book open next to me when I'm writing sex scenes, but at the same time, I do strive for whatever realism I can put in without making the scene clinical. I'm sure there are other examples, but those two both spring to mind.

Check back tomorrow as we celebrate another set of award nominees. For the full list of 2013 award nominees, click here.

Tags: RT Daily Blog, E-Book, Erotica
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