Very Short Reviews Of Difficult Books

Ah, classic literary fiction. It can be so wonderful, but at times dense, leaving us wishing for a guide to lead us through the venerable prose. Enter: Italian artist and writer Francesco D'Isa, who reviews the classics in a candid, tongue-in-cheek (and very short) way. We're happy to bring his column, "Very Short Reviews of Difficult Books," to English language readers! Check back here every Wednesday for three new reviews from Francesco.

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Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

"And this also has been one of the dark places of the earth" says Marlowe looking at London. Civilization is savage — which is, of course, the horror.

Plot: The horror!

Rating: 97 out of 100

Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs

Some drugs offer speldor to the mind; Burroughs takes some of them, but his visions are often too out of his hands to be communicative and can be boring. Sometimes you need control, at least so you don't shoot your wife for fun.

Plot: A guy takes drugs and sees things.

Rating: 70 out of 100

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

The inevitable question is: is she likable or not? The answer is difficult, because Flaubert offer us a person who could be better, if her world had been better.

Plot: A woman has some lovers, falls into debts and <spoiler> dies.

Rating: 97 out of 100

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Past Very Short Reviews of Difficult Books:

5/14/2014

5/7/2014

4/30/2014

4/23/2014

Ready to add some old school titles to your reading list? Check back next week for some more Very Short Reviews of Difficult books, and in the meantime, why not catch up on some lighter fare on our Everything Romance page?